How do YOU pronounce Wario?

Tharthan

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Like that I guess. Anything else sounds weird in a British accent.
Is that "warry" as in rhyming with "marry" (I don't have the merry, Mary, marry merger that some people on my continent have, don't worry. My dialect [a subdialect of New England English, which is a group of dialects spoken in the region of New England on the northeastern coast of the United States] pronounces them all distinctly (a.k.a. the right way) merry has the "e" of met, Mary has the "a" of "mare" and "marry" has the "a" of mat. I don't understand why some people pronounce those words the same way, since the majority of the English speaking world has always pronounced them distinctly, and still does pronounce them distinctly. It's only a few popular dialects in North America that pronounce them the same way. Before those few dialects became popular, no one pronounced them the same way except for speakers of those few dialects. Hence why my dialect has never had that problem, as historically it is of East Anglian descent, and is one of the oldest English dialects in North America.) or "warry" as in "war-ee"?

If it's the former, do you pronounce "Mario" as "marry-oh"? I have met some people who pronounce "Mario" as "marry-oh"; mostly New Yorkers and New York Italians.

Also, you're from the United Kingdom? What region?

The same way I pronounce Mario
Do you pronounce Mario "mah-ree-oh" or "marry-oh"?
 
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Glowsquid

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(I don't have the merry, Mary, marry merger that some people on my continent have, don't worry. My dialect [a subdialect of New England English, which is a group of dialects spoken in the region of New England on the northeastern coast of the United States] pronounces them all distinctly (a.k.a. the right way) merry has the "e" of met, Mary has the "a" of "mare" and "marry" has the "a" of mat. I don't understand why some people pronounce those words the same way, since the majority of the English speaking world has always pronounced them distinctly, and still does pronounce them distinctly. It's only a few popular dialects in North America that pronounce them the same way. Before those few dialects became popular, no one pronounced them the same way except for speakers of those few dialects. Hence why my dialect has never had that problem, as historically it is of East Anglian descent, and is one of the oldest English dialects in North America
the motherfuckers
 

Tharthan

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@Glowsquid I know that it sounds like a pretty petty pet peeve, but it's like nails on a chalkboard for me when someone talks with that merger. And since English has a lot of words that have -er-, -ar- and -arr- in them, I have to hear this sound merger from people far too often. Seriously, it's either I: 1. Only listen to media broadcasts from my region 2. Only listen to media broadcasts from outside of North America or 3. Don't listen to media broadcasts at all. It's very annoying.

And since some of the most popular (although comparably few when compared to the rest of the English speaking world) North American dialects have the merger, I can't watch TV without hearing it either.

And if someone with a name that falls into those sounds has something happen that gets the news stations talking about them, it gets even worse.

People on the news were calling Aaron Hernandez "Erin Hernandez" like he is secretly a woman or something. I couldn't bear to pay any attention because it was too annoying to listen to.

So it might seem petty to you (and it might in fact be petty) but it still annoys me a lot.
 
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CM30

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Is that "warry" as in rhyming with "marry" (I don't have the merry, Mary, marry merger that some people on my continent have, don't worry. My dialect [a subdialect of New England English, which is a group of dialects spoken in the region of New England on the northeastern coast of the United States] pronounces them all distinctly (a.k.a. the right way) merry has the "e" of met, Mary has the "a" of "mare" and "marry" has the "a" of mat. I don't understand why some people pronounce those words the same way, since the majority of the English speaking world has always pronounced them distinctly, and still does pronounce them distinctly. It's only a few popular dialects in North America that pronounce them the same way. Before those few dialects became popular, no one pronounced them the same way except for speakers of those few dialects. Hence why my dialect has never had that problem, as historically it is of East Anglian descent, and is one of the oldest English dialects in North America.) or "warry" as in "war-ee"?

If it's the former, do you pronounce "Mario" as "marry-oh"? I have met some people who pronounce "Mario" as "marry-oh"; mostly New Yorkers or New York Italians.

Also, you're from the United Kingdom? What region?



Do you pronounce mario "mah-ree-oh" or "marry-oh"?
The latter for Wario (War-ee-o). For Mario, it's both the ones you posted.

As for region, somewhere near London.

Also, you remind me of someone I know on another forum...
 

Tharthan

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The latter for Wario (War-ee-o). For Mario, it's both the ones you posted.

As for region, somewhere near London.

Also, you remind me of someone I know on another forum...
Ah, that's what I reckoned. Just wanted to make sure, though.

So you use both "mah-ree-oh" and "marry-oh"? Interesting.

Well, you do know me on another forum. I used the same avatar and everything there. Or do you mean another forum besides that one?
 
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607

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Wah-rio. Same for Mario (but with the W an M, of course). How about Yoshi? You should use a long "oo" (like the o in open), shouldn't you? I always use a short one (like the o in short).
 

Tharthan

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Wah-rio. Same for Mario (but with the W an M, of course). How about Yoshi? You should use a long "oo" (like the o in open), shouldn't you? I always use a short one (like the o in short).
That's not a short "o", that's an "aw" sound. Perhaps you have the cot-caught merger, and do not pronounce "aw" separately from "ah" except before the letter "r"? That may be why you're calling it a short o. Read this: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phonological_history_of_English_low_back_vowels#Cot.E2.80.93caught_merger and tell me if that applies to you.

So you say yaw-shi? I think Kazumi Totaka (the music composer who voices Yoshi) sometimes says it like that too. I have vague memories of him using a "yaw-shi" pronunciation once or twice.
 

607

Piwi!
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That's not a short "o", that's an "aw" sound. Perhaps you have the cot-caught merger, and do not pronounce "aw" separately from "ah" except before the letter "r"? That may be why you're calling it a short o. Read this: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phonological_history_of_English_low_back_vowels#Cot.E2.80.93caught_merger and tell me if that applies to you.

So you say yaw-shi? I think Kazumi Totaka (the music composer who voices Yoshi) sometimes says it like that too. I have vague memories of him using a "yaw-shi" pronunciation once or twice.
No, then short was a wrong example d:p I do use a short o, and there's difference between my cot and caught. I think. I might upload myself saying it sometime later this week, I'm interested d:rolleyes:
 
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