Why is Warioware touched considered disappointing ?

TheDragonFire123

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Is it because it released before Twisted ?
According to what, exactly? I'll agree that it is likely not the most revered of WarioWare games, but not to the point where it's universally considered disappointing, surely. That dishonour might go to Snapped!.

Though I do believe it has one of the lower amounts of microgames out of all Ware games, and suffers from a lack of difficulty, so that may be a contributor.
 

Oblon5

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According to what, exactly? I'll agree that it is likely not the most revered of WarioWare games, but not to the point where it's universally considered disappointing, surely. That dishonour might go to Snapped!.

Though I do believe it has one of the lower amounts of microgames out of all Ware games, and suffers from a lack of difficulty, so that may be a contributor.

According to you, how would you rank warioware game from hardest to easiest ?
 

Glowsquid

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I remember some message board hipsters lambasting the game when it launched, but I think that's more due to relative oversaturation of the series (3.5 releases in about one year) and WarioWare losing its hipster cred factor than any serious widespread backlash against it.

It's the best-selling game in the series and introduced the most popular characters. A quick scan at the likes of Amazon and metacritic shows it has an aggregate critic and user rating in line with the other games. I wouldn't be surprised if it's actually the 2nd most popular entry (after Smooth Moves) to more casual fans if anything.
 

Oblon5

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I remember some message board hipsters lambasting the game when it launched, but I think that's more due to relative oversaturation of the series (3.5 releases in about one year) and WarioWare losing its hipster cred factor than any serious widespread backlash against it.

It's the best-selling game in the series and introduced the most popular characters. A quick scan at the likes of Amazon and metacritic shows it has an aggregate critic and user rating in line with the other games. I wouldn't be surprised if it's actually the 2nd most popular entry (after Smooth Moves) to more casual fans if anything.

The Wii and the NDS might have helped Touched and Smooth Move being the most sold titles.

What do you mean by losing its hipster cred ?
 

Glowsquid

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What do you mean by losing its hipster cred ?
You can say WarioWare as a whole is quite niche compared to other Nintendo franchises, but that was especially the case for the first game. It's a game with a funny high concept that sounds too clever by a half, that wear its Japanese aesthetics and sense of humor on its sleeve in a way that's not typical for Nintendo games, with pretty rough and ugly sprite graphics etc etc. Basically it was quite unlike most games by Nintendo or any other big developer, and so the people that championed it weren't necessarily children and young teenagers as the series now mostly appeals to, but fans of niche games and the like. Indeed, while the original game was legitimately a big success in Japan, it was much less so elsewhere.

There's a Kotaku review for WarioWare Gold where the writer clumsily introduces it by describing his memories of living in Japan and getting drunk off questionable alcohol mixes. That's the crowd the original WW appealed to in the west, is what I'm saying

The first time I ever played a WarioWare game, I was drunk.

Even so, I remember it pretty well. It was March of 2003, and I was living in Kyoto, Japan, about a 20-minute walk from the building where they made WarioWare.

Every so often, I’d take the train down to nearby Osaka to meet a friend, buy video games, eat curry, and finish the night off at an Irish pub called Murphy’s.

The pub introduced us to the concept of Irish Car Bombs. You make an Irish Car Bomb by dropping a shot glass full of Jameson and Bailey’s into half a pint of Guinness. You drink it by just tipping it all into your mouth in one go and hoping the shot glass doesn’t slide down and hit you in the teeth.

I was 22 years old, and this seemed like a good idea.

After a few of these, I left Murphy’s, hopped the last train back to Kyoto, and started looking through my bag of video game purchases. With an hour of travelling to go, I pulled out the big one: Made In Wario, a Game Boy Advance game from Nintendo that would be released a few months later in the West as WarioWare, Inc.

But when Touched and Smooth Moves came out and WarioWare was no longer an one-off quirky hidden gem but Yet Another Franchise that was sold to casuals, it lost its value as a way of establishing your creds as a afficionado of quirky Japanese niche games. Indeed, I looked up an old neogaf thread when Touched was new and one of the criticism a poster had of it was:

In touched, touching is basically just pointing at something, so I think the games are too 'normal'
That kind of says it, doesn't it?
 

Lilypad_36

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But when Touched and Smooth Moves came out and WarioWare was no longer an one-off quirky hidden gem but Yet Another Franchise that was sold to casuals, it lost its value as a way of establishing your creds as a afficionado of quirky Japanese niche games.
So basically what I call the "too-cool-to-be-mainstream" complex?
 

TB100

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Likely because it came out after Twisted!, which had a large amount of content, including 233 microgames. Touched! by comparison, was a lot smaller on that front, only having 190 microgames, which is far less than Twisted and even the original game (which had 213). The touch screen gimmick was also not quite as interesting (especially when every game on the DS was doing it) and the over-reliance on it I felt limited what you could do with the microgames, leading them to feel somewhat same-y, with no real shakeups outside of Mike's microgames, which suffer due to the DS' finicky and sensitive mic.

Touched simply felt like a step down compared to what came before it. Especially in terms of content.

That said, Twisted is still a good game that did really well both critically and especially financially, so it certainly wasn’t a disappointment on that front. I also don't think anyone outside of the fandom really cares.
 
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Oblon5

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You can say WarioWare as a whole is quite niche compared to other Nintendo franchises, but that was especially the case for the first game. It's a game with a funny high concept that sounds too clever by a half, that wear its Japanese aesthetics and sense of humor on its sleeve in a way that's not typical for Nintendo games, with pretty rough and ugly sprite graphics etc etc. Basically it was quite unlike most games by Nintendo or any other big developer, and so the people that championed it weren't necessarily children and young teenagers as the series now mostly appeals to, but fans of niche games and the like. Indeed, while the original game was legitimately a big success in Japan, it was much less so elsewhere.

There's a Kotaku review for WarioWare Gold where the writer clumsily introduces it by describing his memories of living in Japan and getting drunk off questionable alcohol mixes. That's the crowd the original WW appealed to in the west, is what I'm saying



But when Touched and Smooth Moves came out and WarioWare was no longer an one-off quirky hidden gem but Yet Another Franchise that was sold to casuals, it lost its value as a way of establishing your creds as a afficionado of quirky Japanese niche games. Indeed, I looked up an old neogaf thread when Touched was new and one of the criticism a poster had of it was:


That kind of says it, doesn't it?

Thanks for the full write-up. I always love to read about knowledgable people take on an issue.

Some also says Touched introcuced too much gimmick, compared to the sheer simplicity of Inc and Twisted. Gold also has manh playstyles, you have touch, gyro, button, mic... What's your take on it ?
 

Oblon5

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Likely because it came out after Twisted!, which had a large amount of content, including 233 microgames. Touched! by comparison, was a lot smaller on that front, only having 190 microgames, which is far less than Twisted and even the original game (which had 213). The touch screen gimmick was also not quite as interesting (especially when every game on the DS was doing it) and the over-reliance on it I felt limited what you could do with the microgames, leading them to feel somewhat same-y, with no real shakeups outside of Mike's microgames, which suffer due to the DS' finicky and sensitive mic.

Touched simply felt like a step down compared to what came before it. Especially in terms of content.

That said, Twisted is still a good game that did really well both critically and especially financially, so it certainly wasn’t a disappointment on that front. I also don't think anyone outside of the fandom really cares.

Some also says that Smooth Move and Touched did lack the replayability from Twisted. What do they mean ?
 

TheDragonFire123

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Some also says that Smooth Move and Touched did lack the replayability from Twisted. What do they mean ?
Twisted (and later Gold) was famed for the large number of unlockables called Souvenirs that it had, ranging from simple twistable figurines to a recreation of Love Tester. Touched had a sort of approximation called Toys, but not as many. Smooth Moves does even worse, with no Souvenirs nor Toys, and only unlockable modes for its postgame. These probably contribute to the lack of replayability from both titles.
 
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